Legendary journalist dies

Ana Duz

     Used with permission/ Darla Khazei/ Abaca Press/ MCT
 
     Mike Wallace arrives at the 10th Annual Living Landmarks Gala in New York on Nov. 5, 2003. Wallace died at the age of 93 on April 7.

     Mike Wallace, infamous television reporter and host of the show “60 Minutes,” passed away at the age of 93 on  April 7.
 
     Throughout his 50-year-long career as a journalist, Wallace interviewed several people of importance and covered a range of the scandals and topics of the 1970s, such as the Watergate scandal, the Medicaid scamming scandal and the tobacco cancer cover-up. 
 
     Wallace was born in Brookline, Mass. in 1918 and graduated from the University of Michigan in 1939 as a Bachelor of the Arts. 
Wallace started off in radio, hosting local college shows in Michigan. 
 
     He then progressed to acting in television shows in the late 1940s and, eventually, hosting game shows in the 1950s. Wallace’s fame as a journalist didn’t solidify until the 1960s when he joined “60 minutes.”
 
     Wallace’s exposes and muckraking on the Watergate scandal, American Nazis and Vietnam catapulted “60 minutes” to the prime spot in television, which made him famous among the news persona.
 
     In addition to hosting a television show, Wallace also starred and directed several documentaries about topics such as the Nation of Islam, the Cold War, the CIA and the Vietnam War.
He also had CBS specials covering several controversial topics, such as homosexuality and nuclear bombing.
 
     Until his retirement from journalism in 2006, Wallace continued to host and contribute to “60 minutes.” That being said, Wallace continued to do occasional interviews after his retirement, such as his interview of Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
 
     Overall, Wallace received 21 Emmy awards for his work in journalism and several lifetime achievement awards for his work throughout the years.
  
     For the past 20 years, Wallace has lived with a pacemaker and suffered several issues with his health, including heart problems and depression.
     
     He underwent bypass surgery in 2008, which put him “in failing health,” according to his friend Larry King.
 

     In retrospect, Wallace’s career was filled with ups and downs, but was an overall success. He has left copious legacies and has contributed greatly to the world of journalism. 

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2012-05-17 10:08:10

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